What are the implications of the Middle East’s growing economic significance for logistics providers?

Ti is just days away from hosting the Emerging Markets Logistics Conference which will take place in Dubai over June 4th and 5th 2014. As the market leader in knowledge provision on Emerging Markets, Ti has designed a conference programme which will look at the major challenges and opportunities facing logistics service providers in the Middle East and help today’s industry leaders better understand the dynamics of operating in the region. Ahead of the conference, we at the Ti Blog are taking the opportunity to bring you several recently published articles focussing on the region as well as the conference and its sessions that first appeared as part of Ti’s free Logistics Briefing service. For more information on the conference, you can visit www.ticonferences.com. To sign up for Ti’s Logistics Briefing service, click here.

With a combined regional GDP growth rate expected to surpass that of the overall global rate by 2015, the Middle East has undergone quite a transformation. In the World Economic Forum’s Global Competitiveness Report 2012-13, the UAE was ranked first among Arab countries and 24th out of 144 countries globally, a gain of three positions from 2011. The report described the UAE economy as an innovation-driven economy. Another example of this transformation can be seen in the latest findings of Agility’s Emerging Markets Logistics Index, compiled by Transport Intelligence, in which four Middle East countries are ranked in the top 20 with Saudi Arabia the highest of these countries at number 3. Meanwhile, according to the Minister of Transport and Communications of Oman, plans are in place to develop Oman as a key logistics destination.

What is driving this transformation? What does it mean for logistics providers? What does it mean to investors? Join Transport Intelligence June 4 and 5 in Dubai for a lively discussion on these and other questions. Along with sponsors Aramex, Kewill and Kogan Page as well as Ti’s conference partner, Agility, and support from Logistics Executive and The Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport, sessions will focus on a wide variety of topics.

The theme for the first day, “The promising Middle East – A look at this region’s growing logistics attractiveness” will cover an array of topics beginning with thoughts from Agility’s CEO Essa Al Saleh and Ti’s CEO, John Manners-Bell regarding the findings from the latest Agility Emerging Markets Logistics Index. Following this session, there will be a discussion on trade patterns. The Middle East has become a centre of transshipments and Central Asia is emerging as a major trade route linking Asia, Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Meanwhile, African infrastructure projects continue to expand, thus further opening this continent to increasing trade. Sean Doherty, Director and Head of Supply Chain and Transport Industry for the World Economic Forum will lead a discussion on these changing trade dynamics. The afternoon will see sessions on Middle East infrastructure and the day will conclude with Ken Lyons, IT consultant and a member of Ti’s Advisory Board leading a conversation on supply chain outsourcing and IT developments.

The second day, “The Middle East – More than just oil and gas but what about the risks?” will likely pique much discussion. Indeed, the Middle East is much more than oil and gas. Sessions will include discussions surrounding logistics opportunities in e-commerce, perishables and healthcare and of course, oil and gas. What is expected to be a provocative debate on supply chain risks – political, economic, environment will conclude the conference.

Commenting on the upcoming conference Transport Intelligence’s CEO, John Manners-Bell said, “The Middle East’s position as a hub for Europe, the Indian sub-continent, Africa and central Asia is already well under development and has been a major success story for many countries in the region. However the aim of our conference will be to critically examine prospects for the region – positive and negative. Whilst an emerging middle class, investment in transport infrastructure and the creation of free trade areas will stimulate logistics activity, we will also be analysing the impact of over-capacity, corruption, political instability and security issues.”

In the weeks leading up to the conference, Ti will highlight various sessions in more detail including the launch of a unique Middle East e-commerce Logistics white paper in partnership with Aramex and finally the weekly special edition briefings will culminate in an exclusive interview with Ti’s CEO and Agility’s CEO.

Join us on Twitter to keep up with the latest in conference news as well as to share your thoughts at #TiDubai2014.

For additional information and to register for the event, please contact Sarah Smith, head of marketing and events at ssmith@transportintelligence.com.

Advertisements

One thought on “What are the implications of the Middle East’s growing economic significance for logistics providers?

  1. Logistics can help in moving the entire economy. As there is a connection between the economic growth and demand for product-transporting services that impact towards the freight and logistics companies. Thank for sharing such an informative blog.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s